Category Archives: conferences

Illustration, Fox writing with a quill pen, J. Mason, G. Greatbach, 1852, New York Public Library

4 of 4 Basic Steps to Stats: Writing up the Results in APA Format

After deciding what analysis to run (step 1) Apple pockets and Oranges
and running and interpreting the analysis (step 2 and 3) lode runner
It’s time to write up the results in APA format (step 4)! Illustration, Fox writing with a quill pen, J. Mason, G. Greatbach, 1852, New York Public Library
APA Conventions for All Statistical Analyses:

The specific numbers and letters to report for each analysis are different.  However, all letters, like t, M, SD should be in italics – that’s key for APA style!

Useful Resources:

Here are a few sites that I’ve found to be useful for figuring out how to report certain statistics in APA style.

(A number of my students are using MANOVA’s for their final projects so the number of MANOVA links reflect this. If these links are not helpful a Googlesearch of terms like “reporting a chi-square in APA format” should yield some useful references).

General stats analyses: http://www.psych.uw.edu/writingcenter/writingguides/pdf/stats.pdf

Good for reporting MANOVA https://statistics.laerd.com/spss-tutorials/one-way-manova-using-spss-statistics-2.php

very clear explanation: http://www.ucdenver.edu/academics/colleges/nursing/Documents/PDF/MANOVAHowTo.pdf

Also good on reporting: http://grimbeek.com.au/Papers/MANOVA%20reporting.pdf

Explanation of Manova and ANOVA http://ibgwww.colorado.edu/~carey/p7291dir/handouts/manova1.pdf

Another great resource is UCLA’s stats site – though the site can be difficult to navigate so at times I find it easier to Google “UCLA reporting a chi-square in APA format” as opposed to going directly to the UCLA page.

Finally, as always, show your results to your peers and professors to get their opinions and perspectives on the selected analysis, the interpretation and your APA formatting.

 

My Society for Research on Adolescence (SRA) Austin Experience

I have only one regret with regards to my  Society for Research on Adolescence (SRA) Austin experience.

The President of SRA, Stephen T. Russell delivered a spectacular address:Stephen T Russel Urgency

The above photo depicts a key moment of his speech where he questioned who gets to define the evidence base, proven strategies and what is ready to communicate? The last point on the slide questions the boundaries between science and advocacy. Russell asked the audience to consider if scientists can and should be objective.

In other highlights:
SRA Poster, Kreniske and Ruck
 At my poster withProfessor Ruck

I met a number of engaging grad students, my poster was well received, and I reconnected with one of my former professors, Jeff Cookston, from San Francisco State University.

It was a great conference – especially for grad students or “emerging scholars” – like me – they even had a room for us with free coffee and tea!

Just a few blocks from the conference I stumbled upon a hint of what keeps  Austin weird as I perused this

                        funky art gallery…

monkey lovehummingbird printdali cereal

 

And then spent some quality time with my brother and sister in law!

My only regret?

Stubbs doesn’t open til 11am so I couldn’t pull a Frank Underwood and eat ribs for breakfast.

Stubbs BBQ AM
Stubbs BMQ AM

 

Defending My Dissertation Proposal with Prezi

In late December I successfully defended my dissertation proposal, titled Writing as Development and the Implications of Blogging. Despite my cautious review of Prezi, I decided to use it for the defense for a few key reasons.

1. Powerpoint is soporific

Powerpoint is soporific – it makes people in the room tired. This isn’t always the case – some people are great with PowerPoint, I’m just not one of them. Prezi designs are sleek, so compared to PowerPoint, it takes a lot less work to make your presentation look good.

2. Reinstated Privacy Function

locked

Second, Prezi has reinstated the private function. When I wrote the previous review, Prezi had temporarily removed the feature that allowed users to create private presentations. This was problematic. For example, consider my  my proposal presentation. After presenting I hoped to get feedback from my committee (of three professors) and then make revisions before proceeding with the final paper and subsequent data collection. I wanted to be able to decide after the presentation what was public and private and what would be changed.

Luckily Prezi reinstated the locked or private presentation function. As you might notice I made the presentation private and have kept it that way. My committee gave me critical feedback that changed the research method and some of the final directions. I’d like my presentation to reflect these changes before I make it public. In addition, I have yet to do the research. I know it is unlikely, but what if someone were to see my presentation and be able carry out my design before I do!

3. Familiar Turf

Finally,  Prezi needs the latest Flash player to run, so if you are using an unfamiliar computer this could be a problem. However, my defense was at the Graduate Center – where I spend a lot of time so I was able to test out the computer well in advance. Looking ahead this may be an issue.

And how was my proposal defense you might ask?

I’d rather not write too much about that…at least the Prezi worked! Overall, it went well. The basic format was as follows, I talked for about 20 -25 minutes,  then each of the three committee members offered  some excellent feedback.  I later incorporated their comments into a revised copy of my proposal, which I  submitted to The Graduate Center. If you’re interested in the content of the proposal you can check out a brief description on my New Media Lab page.

And the future?

Jean Piaget Society Banner

I’m slated to present the initial results of my research in late May at the Jean Piaget Society Conference in San Francisco. I will not be able to test out the computers beforehand. If I choose Prezi I must accept the possibility that it may not work. But no matter what presentation software I choose – there’s  a risk of technical failure, and based on my experiences Prezi only slightly increases this risk. Prezi as a PDFDownloading the Prezi as a PDF is a good backup, it won’t look as good but at least if Prezi does not work I will still be able to scroll through the PDF as I talk. Even if I know there won’t be any tech issues, I’ve found printing out the PDF’s is useful as it helps keep me on track during a talk and I can always check the printout for what’s next before moving what’s projected on the screen. I’ll be sure to post an update on how Prezi worked after the conference!

 

 

SRCD and AERA

A sentence or two for the conference, one sentence for the city:

I know it sounds dry, but I went to the session on ‘New IRB Policies and the Ethical Conduct of Child and Adolescent Research’, and it was exciting and terrifying to hear that the experts were somewhat unsure about the IRB protocols for research using social technologies like Facebook, Twiiter, and blogs. I also had some good conversations about my poster and am somewhat inspired to rewrite my paper and finally find it a home.

Though wet as expected, Seattle surprised me with some delectable eats, like fresh oysters and juicy salmon burgers at the Pike Place Market.
pike street market

At AERA Michael Olivas gave an engaging speech titled Immigrant DREAMS Deferred, and the professional development session, Narrative Inquiry in Education, delivered by Colette Daiute and myself went well too.

It was wonderful to see all my old friends in San Francisco, and it was even sunny for a couple days to boot!